‘Queenie’ by Candice Carty- Williams Review: Black British women get the spotlight

Queenie by Candice Carty-Williams was published in March of this year but buzz around the story built up well before its release. This is partly due to it being a contemporary fiction novel where an everyday Black British woman takes centre stage. It’s being hailed as the ‘black Bridget Jones’ (it’s not). I find it…

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J’Ouvert: A play taking on the politics of Notting Hill Carnival

J’ouvert is an honest, fun, warm and witty story and the perfect warm-up for Carnival!

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Why you should read Akala’s Natives

The ability for collective, selective amnesia in the service of easing a nation’s cognitive dissonance is nowhere better exemplified than in the manner that much of Britain has chosen to remember transatlantic slavery…and the British Empire I have a lot of respect for Akala. He is a hip hop artist who has won at the…

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Festivaling While Black

I’m okay when I realise despite the extremely black headline, I am one of about 0.0002 black people and 0.0008 people of colour in total out of forty thousand people at Longitude festival in Ireland. I’m okay when a drug-fuelled reveller headbutts me by accident and splits my lip. I reapply my Fenty lip-gloss and…

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7 Black British Spoken Word Poets You Should Know (and Love)

Prepared to be entertained and educated listeners of spoken word poetry. Many Black Brits are using spoken word poetry as a platform to celebrate the fragments of cultures that make our identities hybridised and unique.  They also position themselves as representatives of our community’s shared frustration regarding inequalities, ethnic tags and other ongoing issues that…

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Repat: Sommas in Kampala

“I can’t wait for these Sommas to go” V exclaims whilst peering over her black cat eye sunglasses at the crowd gathering outside one of our favourite bars. ‘Somma’ is a term created by Ugandans to describe those who live/grew up abroad and come to Uganda during the holiday periods to live it up in…

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The Westernisation of Nollywood  – the Loss of the Family Film and a Unique Identity?

One could say that the growth of African cinema can be owed to the prominent Nollywood. The continuous stream of stories dedicated to exploring the polygamy, witchcraft and barrenness in Nigeria. Not to mention the rise of megastars like Genevieve Nnaji, Funke Akindele-Bello, Mercy Johnson, Jim Iyke, Ramsay Noah and of course Osita Iheme. These…

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Seven Black British Podcasts You Should Be Listening To

Podcasting has fast become a ubiquitous media format for consumption. From the highly entertaining, to the incredibly informative, there’s something out there for everyone looking for audio respite. Here are just seven of the best Black British podcasts, each covering a variety of perspectives and topics. The Receipts Who: Tolly T, Audrey (formerly known as…

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Reminder: Black Brits Need Sun Protection Too!

That freak trial period of summer in April 2018 had us thinking of evening and weekend motives, outfits and getaways. But did sun protection cross your mind? Probably not. When you think of sunburn, you may conjure up images of flushed skin of a paler hue. Advertising doesn’t help. As with countless instances in mainstream…

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British Nigerian Author Changing Perceptions of Race and Gender Roles with Her Series of Children’s Books

Tola Okogwu is a British blogger and author of the ‘Daddy Do My Hair?’ book series for children. Launching her third book in the series ‘Kechi’s Hair Goes Every Which Way’ in May 2018, Tola wants to tackle the relationship between young black girls and their natural afro hair in a vibrant, entertaining and educational…

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